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corruption, the gap between rich and poor, and threats to the environment. but amidst all of this, china's economy continues to grow. president xi jinping and his administration are pushing ahead with reforms, as they aim for long-term stability. we'll have insight, and analysis, all week as part of our series, "china: road to reform." let's take you live now to beijing where nhk world's raja pradhan is leading our coverage. >> hi, gene. in two days, china's biggest annual political event kicks off right here in the capital, and preparations are fully under way. one of the biggest concerns right now is security. as thousands of representatives arrive here in beijing. there's even a bigger security presence because of this weekend's deadly attacks in the southern city of kunling. here's a look at what i saw around the meeting venue. tiananmen square in the center of beijing is also the center of political power. directly to the west is the great hall of the people, where just once a year china's biggest issues are put forward, prioritized and discussed. china's top decisionmakers are gath
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> and later on the, to the ice cometh. we'll take you where the flooding arrived. take a look at this. the flooding arrives in frozen form. a frozen river moving fast. we'll be right back. hey guys! sorry we're late. did you run into traffic? no, just had to stop by the house to grab a few things. you stopped by the house? uh-huh. yea. alright, whenever you get your stuff, run upstairs, get cleaned up for dinner. you leave the house in good shape? yea. yea, of course. ♪ [ sportscaster talking on tv ] last-second field go-- yea, sure ya did. [ male announcer ] introducing at&t digital life. personalized home security and automation. get professionally monitored security for just $29.99 a month. with limited availability in select markets. ♪ witmarge: you know, there's in a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious, and a good source of fiber to help support regularity. wife: mmmm husband: these are good! marge: the tasty side of fiber. from phillips. save you fifteen percent or
and blind development. we must strengthen the economic environment and resolve to take forceful measures to complete this challenging task. >> now, we heard the announcements from before and there are many people who are worried about whether or not the government at the end of the day is really going to be willing to sacrifice growth in order to try to push through some of these reforms and address some of on these issues, not only on pollution, but also on debt. in terms of pollution, people are saying that if you really want to shut down a lot of these factory webs you could end up with a lot of workers who don't have any place to go. that is one of the main concerns that could actually leave some questions in people's minds as to whether or not the government will be able to push ahead and make these changes, julia. >> thank you. and if i also noticed a 12.5% rise in their defense budget, too. we've seen expressions of concern before the japanese, which is perhaps surprising. is that a waste of money? what's the feedback been on that rise? i know it's something they seem to do everyt
in environment, north dakota had the lowest flu rates. in the bay area new new flu deaths reported this week. santa clara leads bay area with the most death. a 15th victim was reported earlier this week. >>> new troubles for sears, the retailer is investigating a possible security breach. officials with sears say they are actively reviewing their systems, but so far have found no information indicating a breach. it's not clear what prompted the security investigation. according to bloomberg news the security review is still at an early stage and pinpointing a cyber attack can take weeks of the sears is already coping with years' of declining sale and looking to reenergy sales with a focus on echief meteorologist. >>> it appears that a reaction to spike lee harsh word of gentrification came in the form of a spray can and a rock or two. somebody painted "do the right thing on lee'sliehood home in brooklyn. vandals painted the stairs on lee family home as well. incident happened days after the filmmaker spoke out about wealthy new residents moving into the area and dismiss the other residents.
. the project would be bad for the environment. in january the u.s. state department released a report saying it would have little environmental impact. >> it is moving on a busy highway between houston and dallas, texas after a highway was turned into a ice skating rink. causing gridlock on the 30 mile stretch of the highway for about 16 hours. >> people stuck in their cars for 14 hours. we had people sleep in the parking lot in their cars because there was no place to go. there were no hotel rooms left. >> traffic began moving late last night. law enforcement urging caution and to watch out for the black ice. >> the weather continues to be a big story across the country. the snow may be gone but freezing temperatures they are not. >> another blast of arctic air celting across half of occur ur country. >> the temperatures seeing well below average across the midwest the plains ants into the northeast. that has been a trend for the last several months. the cold arctic blast settling in. the current windchill temperatures as you head out the door this morning staying below zero in the teens in
. c p s says it's working to ensure a proper environment for students to take the test. according to some parents, but district made calls to stress the test is required by state and federal law. >> i am against it. i sent my daughter out of it because i am aware is not counting toward promotion or anything. >> the state board of education says the test provide a valuable data on how districts are ferrying in meeting higher benchmarks. this morning the test is supposed to be administered to all students grades 3-8 regardless of whether they are opting out. back to you. >> suspended. getting a second chance. cbs took away their city championship and their 24 victories because they used players that were academically ineligible. the head coach was suspended. now the illinois high school association says the school can still be in the state tournament. there will keep their top seed but they still won't have two of their best players or coaches. parents of players at other schools have mixed reactions. >> i think they should have a chance especially if there were number one the work
environment to work in. we should point out, these three individuals, these al jazeera journalists are among thousands of protesters, activists and other journalists who are facing a similar ordeal many say it's trials like this and other detentions that are a troubling sign that egypt is going back to a repressive, authoritative state instead of going towards fulfilling the promises of the 2011 revolution. >> syrian government forces are waging a campaign of siege warfare and starvation against civilians as part of the military campaign against rebel fighters. >> that's among the findings of a u.n.-mandated independent report which has just been released. the investigation, catalogue of the suffering 250,000 people who are besieged across syria, government forces were accused of denying basic aid in order to force people to choose between surrender and stashation. war crimes have been committed by opposition groups. more from geneva >> reporter: this is that report. 7th report of the independent international commission on inquiry on syria since that commission was set up by the u.n. in 201
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ but if you cholose your eyes does it always feel like nothing's aged at all ♪ ♪ and if you close your eyes does it almost feel like ♪ >>> time now for cramer and "stop trading" jim. >> the idea that craft beer may have peaked and going back to buds, people are bud izzing abo that. boston beer numbers is not what we expected, this sam. and anheuser-busch, inbev, grade number turnaround in brazil and mexico, huge places that drink beer. is it a trend that can continue? if boston beer wants to spend less money they can show better gross margins. but this deal worked out. and worked out for constellation. the beer market's good. i don't want to make too much of the idea that craft beer has peaked but people will reach that conclusion. >> spirits taking a lot of share overall. >> diagio reported a quarter that was not so hot and the stock came back. if people want to take a real close look at boston beer they're no
, look, in a hyper partisan environment where he has to run for re-election, an issue like this can be polarized. any issue around race, as you know, wolf, sends people to their full rise corners. the last thing the president wants to do when he's running for re-election is to have a country more polarized. i think the beauty of this time now is you can have more risky conversations that are important for moving this country forward right now in his second term. so i'm thankful that he did. >> i want to play another excerpt from the president's powerful speech. cornell and don, both of you listen to this. >> no excuses. government and philanthropy, faith-based communities, we've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience. that's what we're here for. but you've got responsibilities, too. and i know you can meet the challenge. many of you already are, if you make the effort. it may be hard, but you will have to reject the cynicism that the circumstances of your birth or societies injustices necessarily defines you and your future. it will take courage but you'
? >> well, it's a new operational environment for him. where we want him to work is the new york city subway system. we do transit canine. because it's a stressful environment overseas in afghanistan, he -- it's very hard for a dog to work in our subway system. >> tell the people what he's going to be doing. by the way, what experience did he learn over there that he can translate into saving lives here in new york? >> cesar is an explosive detection dog. he's trained on all the odors we train on here in new york. he does have 12 legitimate finds in afghanistan. so he's proven. now what we're going to do is transition him into a police dog. he's going to be patrolling the new york city subway system. >> so you guys are going to go through a 12-week session together? >> yes. >> new training. >> what needs to be done? >> i'm not sure. we haven't started the training yet. we're starting as of this week. i'm new to the transit system. i came from a precinct. >> so you're both starting together. he's going to start with a new name, correct? >> no, we're going to keep the name. >> oh, that's great
environment today, even a small business has to spend $20,000 to $30,000 just complying with the 2800 regulations we layered on them federally let alone the state and local. you know, erin, i invest in small businesses every week. what's what i do. you should have these people talk to you. or even better still, let the president talk to somebody running a 17-person business in massachusetts or 30 employees in california. and hear what they say. they would not agree with him. and i think that is the core and the essence of america that we're not listening to. we need to listen to these people. they should tell us what to do. what they want right now is less government. >> thank you very much. i remember, by the way, the president saying he was going to go back and cut a whole lot of regulations. there was a big push for that. when you say 2800 on average, i'm going to assume you know your stats on that. that's horrific. that's probably something you could agree with the president on, too. still to come, a controversial bill some say is anti-gay in front of arizona's governor tonight. w
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
. this keeps -- >> this is holding the environment hostage. >> and we have seen this before where people sit in trees and things like that. look, this keystone pipeline is such a no-brainer, everybody with the exception of the president and these people -- >> unions want it. >> for the jobs created. president obama0s own state department issued a report, gaving it the okay. this has been under study for six years and every single tied study says the environmental impact will be -- transporting the oil and national gas via train, truck, other ways, will actually -- >> you don't want to -- they're not tying themselves to the white house fence, they're loyal and speak for many who are environmental conscious and thigh think this pipeline is nuts. so the president has been delay, delay, delay, keep the union guys happen they might open it up and get the jobs going, and the environmentalists. but you can only wait this out so lodge it's been five years. >> it's ridiculous at this point. every study has come back saying the environmental impact will be minimal. and transcanada will not wait foreve
difference is, that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so, when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. >> reporter: teens from chicago saw themselves in the president, as well. >> to my surprise, he was just like me. growing up without a father. and sometimes, not too concerned with school. >> reporter: today's event was to launch my brother's keeper, a mentoring program for at-risk youth. >> part of our initiative is, no excuses. it will take courage. but you have to tune out the naysayers who say the deck is stacked against you, you might as well give up. or settle into the stereotype. >> reporter: this is the third time the president has met with this group of teens from chicago. the last time was on father's day. and you can expect, he'll meet with them again. this, diane, is clearly a growth that he's established a close, personal connection with the president. >> a very different kind of speech today. thank you so much, jonathan karl. >>> now, we head overseas to ukraine, where this was the image on the ground. masked gunman raising
that. we will do so in a windy with their retirement.whether it environmentweather environment. >> will take what we can get at this >> will take what we can get at this point. in the criminal justice system the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: the police, who investigate crime and the district attorneys, who prosecute the offenders. these are their stories. don't be a drag, brooke, darling. some amaretto souffle a little vin santo and then you and whoever can do... whatever. man: ciao. ciao, massimo. we really shouldn't, but then we thought well, maybe just a little dessertio. ma, certo. un momentino, ah? tonight i'm going to go to bed with a frenchman. oh? proust. i'm sure you read his cliffnotes at vassar. i know who proust is. he invented that cookie, right? prego. ah, massimo... grazie. grazie. oh... signore sanderson! please... doctor... si. yes, doctor. please, uh, is there a doctor? please? vicente! signore sanderson... no-no-no-no-no. what happened to him? he was short of breath.
into cyclicals as we go forward at a low inflationary environment with the fed struggling. sgr >> financials were getting a little bit of a bid. maybe it was a rotation out of the over valued names. want to go back to the main point as we head into the close close. the dow is off almost 250 points. >> bear in mind, 1848 for ages, for weeks and weeks we were trying to break through the new highs, 1848. stutter steps, we finally got there then 1850 would sas resis. finally yesterday we were decisively over that. you get these stutter steps up and back. it's not -- it hasn't been a straight line up but so far since the end of january, we've been doing pretty well. february was a great month. >> the market has been pretty much straight up for the last couple weeks after that big pullback earlier this year, and i think we may be in for some more jitters. i agree with my colleagues here that, you know, some of it has to do with the weekend and the news in the ukraine, but i think there's a lot of geopolitical uncertainty. 21 elections coming up. there may be some excuses for a little pullback. >> subpr
attempt. >> and a delicate balancing act between the environment and economy at lake tahoe. >> and a live look tonight from the top of mount tam you'll see how wet weather improved outlook for water supply. good evening. this next round of rain isn't a strong storm, but every drop counts in a drought, obviously. spencer? >> you're right. and we're counting many drops w. you can see light rainfall now. you can see that right here in the san francisco area from san francisco and south we have a steady rainfall at the moment. giving you the looping radar, you can see batches of rain beginning and continuing i should saying to move into our direction. nearly 4-tenths in mount st. helena. again, rain continues throughout the evening and overnight hours the totals will grow and we'll have totals later. >> the storm isn't looking like a big rain maker but last two were stronger and wetter. wayne freedman joins us with a look. >> people have been hearing about the drought. bad
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
in an environment that was a little bit more for giving. so when i made a mistake the consequences were not as severe. >>reporter: freens chicago saw themselves in the president as well. >> to my surprise he was just like me. agreeing up without a father. and sometimes not too concerned with school. >>reporter: today event was to launch my brother keeper. mentoring program for at risk youth. >> part of close close message in this initiative is no excuses. it will take courage but you have to type out the naysayer who say the deck is stacked against you you mit as well just give up. settle in to the stereo type. >>reporter: this was third time the president met with this group of teens from chicago. last time was on father's day t.you can expect he will meet thel with them again. this is clearly a group the president has established a real personal connection with. jonathan karl, the white house. >> this is video more rare than pictures of lock necessary monster b.to see the first known video of a u.s. supreme court proceeding. spectator sneaked a videocam are into yesterday se
environment, and he had a mum and he had grandparents and teachers who looked out for him. his view was if every child - they should have the opportunities he had. we all have a responsibility to make sure we provide that to them, and there are examples of programs that are working, improving the young men, the boy's lives, putting them on a positive trajectory, and we should put them to scale. it's good, not just for moral reasons, but it's good for the economy. they are the workforce for tomorrow. >> you talk about what is good for the economy and important for business, you will need the partnership of business. this is an initiative funded not by the federal government. >> the president said it's not a big federal government program. we shouldn't require additional resources, we should be smarter about how to use the resources and make sure they support programs that work and create incentives. this responsibility comes down on the business community. they can provide summer jobs, internship, mentorship, funding of not for profit organizations such as becoming a man. when you li
is he lived in a forgiving environment. he had a mom and teachers and adults who looked out for him. his hope was that these young men would have the chances that he had. programs that are improving these boys' lives amount putting them on -- and putting them on a positive trajectory, so we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. that's good not just for moral reasons but that it's good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we hav should inven them. >> you talk about what's important for economy and business and you will need the cooperation of business. >> the president said this is not another big federal program. in fact we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the resources that we do have. we should make sure that the funds that we have are going to support programs that work and creating incentives for programs that work. but this responsibility comes down on the business community. and they have responsibility. they can provide summer jobs. internships, mentorship, funding of not for profit provide thes
're in this zero interest rate environment among the g-8 in a lot of ways people are stretching to always look for yield, right? and at this point in time there's not much alpha in the fixed income world so it's driving people to always look for that opportunity. i think selectively there are tremendous opportunities in emerging markets. but you have to be careful and do your due dildiligence. >> i imagine you have a number of etfs for that, right? >> we do. and we're very happy about our new etf, too. >> be well. >> pleasure. >>> we are a few days away from jobs friday and, of course, that means another opportunity for you to nail the number and win a prize. tweets your predictions for february nonfarm payrolls. use your handle @squawkstreet and if you win, you'll receive this, cnbc hat signed by the whole "squawk on the street" team. are we going to show a video of it? i guess not. we've got it behind us. we'll sign it right now. back here, yes. very nice. sara's going to put it on right now. >> no, it will ruin my hair. >> the ear flaps will work. >> the producer called it a flapper hat. is
't give it enough emphasis. but it creates an environment where there is too much of it. i think fraud problem can be fixed. it is fairly simple. gerri: another 30billion for highways just as we have potholes all over new york city you could lose your car in. net-net when, you look at this budget, what will it mean for the economy? is it thumbs up or thumbs down? >> it is thumbs down because it just continues on kinds of policies we've had. i would like to spend more on road but i give it at office. carve it out of the department of education and money you're sending my university and others we would be better off with less cash learning to be more frugal. >> peter, thanks for coming on. great to see you again. >> take care. >> thank you. now the latest developments on the recall scandal, rocking general motors. ceo mary barra finally coming out on the issue, finally talking, posting a letter to employees online. the company launched an internal investigation and acted without hesitation when the issue was brought to her team. but the company waited years, years before issuing its 1.4
environment he has here in chicago. it's handmade marquee says it all. as much irq esteem. he's one of the dozens of at risk kids who take part. and here zachariah learns the most important lesson of all. that in life, you fall and fall again, and you keep ongoing. >> when i fall, i get back up. >> i wanted to help him understand perseverance, and motivation, and perspective and looking forward to things and having plans. >> the unicycle is zachariah's favorite. it's all free for zachariah, but his sister feels that what the circus does for him is invaluable. she knows firsthand because she used to be in this too. >> the gang bang members in the streets, we still get affected by what's around us, but i guess it gives you two hours in a day in which you're not. >> and zachariah's future? well, he's still juggling that. >> i would really like to work as a doctor, and i think my boss will give me money so i can give it to charity. idle really like to be a cameraman and do a circus theme. >> and for zachariah, all of those falls of circus themes have helped him find the best in himse
about the horrors left behind if sudan, or the tough environment in chicago. the hand-made marquee says it all. "circesteem" it's called, open to all kids ages 3 to 18. payment is on a sliding scale. zachariah modi is one of the dozens of rev gee family members and at-risk kids that take part. zachariah modi learns the most important lesson in life, you fall and fall and fall again - and you keep on going. >> when i fall down, then i get back up and it like a person in "circesteem" never quits. >> i want him to use it as a tool for perseverance, motivation, having perspective. looking forward to things, having plans. >> the unicycle is zachariah modi's favourite, and the high wire the hardest. there's tutoring in between. it's free, but zachariah modi's sister knows it is invaluable. she knows first hand, because she had been there too. >> we are still affected by what is around us. it gives you two hours in a day in which you are not. >> zachariah modi's future - he is juggling that. >> i want to be a doctor. they can give me money, i can give it to charity. >> or a cameraman. >> and f
on the environment beyond the end of this term. it's an interesting read. >> fossil fuels, they don't like them. by the way, china in their new five five-year plan, thank you, mao, is talking about environmental cleaner. that's instrumental. you got to be able to gauge the ability to be able to see your feet in the smog there. and i know that that's where the real issues are for global warming. obviously they take our jobs. they do a lot of global warming. but we're worried about keystone. in the meantime the trucks and the trains are going to take it all. they are terrible ways. trains don't use that much pollution, but understand that when warren buffett said it's better, a big pipeline cop,mpany, but burlington northern will be the primary beneficiary so i thought he was unconflicted and also unqualified. >> very nice. down is down 27 or 29 points let's get to bob pisani on the floor. good morning. >> good morning. we started in positive territory on the s&p but we just turned negative and, of course, we were at historic highs not just there but the midcap and small cap in
to build healthier learning environments for our kids. part of this effort will be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. thatnk we can all agree our classroom should be healthy places where kids are not bombarded with ads for junk food. food marketing guidelines are tot of the larger effort inspire companies to think about how they campaign for food to kids. kids watch thousands of food advertisements every year. 86% of these ads are for products loaded with sugar and salt. our kids see an average of just one ad a week for healthy products like water, fruits and vegetables. just one. begun the we have first ever white house summit on food advertising to children, asking businesses to stop marketing unhealthy foods to kids and do more to get kids excited about healthy foods. should applynciple to our schools. about theant to talk "let's move" campaign. the federal government's efforts to combat childhood obesity. you can see the numbers on your screen. do you think this is a good idea? isn't an area of the federal area that the federal gover
their bills. this bill provides a commonsense way to protect our environment by setting emissions standards that are actually achieveable. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana yields back. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from west virginia, mr. rahall. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. rahall: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the ranking member yielding me this time, especially since we do not see eye to eye on this particular piece of legislation. we do see eye to eye on numerous other issues before the congress and the american people, such as protecting the health and safety of our nation's coal miners and our american workers, and indeed, we all, both sides of the aisle, share the common goal of wanting to provide clean water, clean air, and health and safety for our families each and every day of the year. in that sense, we all have that common ground. the
environment, policies are changing in this country in terms of the consumption of food. the importance of feeding kids a healthy breakfast. michaela, i'm not sure if you know this. let me tell you this. children who consume a healthy breakfast and who are physically active for a minimum of 30 minutes a day perform higher on mathematical tests up to 17% higher. they excel in reading. in many cases, they read at a great level higher. we call that the learning connection. the impact that eating healthy and being physically active has on performance, behavior, attendance. so my response back to you is, let's make sure we find ways for kids to be active before, during, and after the school day. as parents, it is our responsibility to make sure we are talking to our school administrators. we are making sure our kids are not going hungry when they walk into the school building and much of what the first lady is doing is making sure the kids get the proper nutrients that they can get in the school building at a minimum. >> alexis glick, thank you so much for this. you can hear the passion in h
was nowhere around, nowhere near her and it was a very protected environment. this is very far from what a town hall in new hampshire, iowa, or any of the early primary states look like and, frankly, i was struck sitting there by how much measured, how cautious she was and the fact that she doesn't connect with young people nearly to the same level that her husband did or that barack obama does. they would have had that room vibrating. i found it quite inspirational. >> interesting to hear that. and that may play into what we're going to hear from glenn rush. you wrote an article that went off in "politico" overnight, a really, really interesting profile of joe biden. he sat down with him, interviewed him on an amtrack train. and you heard about this retreat that was attended by all sorts of joe biden insiders. and they went to this retreat and the people with joe biden came out saying this. you wrote this. the others at the biden retreat came away feeling that clinton would ultimately decide not to run. but insiders telling you they believe biden -- that hillary clinton would decide not
of a father in young african-american families, especially in urban environments. but i think it's inescapable that he was more retiscent on these issues in the first term than in the second term. again, there are reasons for that and you don't want to be seen as the african-american president. you want to be seen as the president of the united states but i think we are seeing a certain freedom that the president is expressing today in terms of what he wants to talk about, don. >> reporter: are you talking to me? >> yeah. >> reporter: jake, he is the african-american president. he's an african-american president. he's a president of all people but, again, he has a responsibility as president to help everyone but he is a black man. and as i said, he understands the issues that we as african-americans face more than any other president that we have had they used to call bill clinton the first black president just for fun but, yes, i think he has more of a freedom. listen, in his first term he didn't do that much about gay rights and gay marriage and it started to happen in the second term. he ha
their overall political environment is favoring republicans. i think that has to do with the residue and hangover of all the health care controversies that battled the administration. we're still seeing some of the effects of that. the other thing in the republicans' favor is just the overall map when they're going to be in alaska, even in a state like north carolina, that ends up helping republicans, but is it the arizona that veto pointed out, even though it was vetoed, we've seen the republican party trip up on social issues, whether it was on that, whether it's on gay marriage, whether it's talking about contraception, and democrats want to be able to exploit that. i'm not sure that's necessarily going to be that silver bullet come 2014 in the mid terms, but that's what they want. >> let's talk about the senate here. we have a list of some of the republicans mentioned already. cory gardner, but bill cassidy, steve danes, tomorrow -- tom cotton. >> they have a lot of paths to pick up those senate seats, but those you just mentioned, in 2012, they didn't have a good track record. t
in an environment that was a little more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe p. i had people who encouraged me, not just my mom and grandparents, but wonderful teachers and dmunt leaders. they pushed me to work hard, study hard, make the most of myself. if i didn't listen, they said it again. if i didn't listen, they said it a third time. they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me, so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then, and i repeat it now, because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i had. that's why we are here today. to do what we can in this year of action to give more young americans the support they need to make good choices. and to be resilient, and to overcome obstacles. and achieve their dreams. this is an issue of national important. it is as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no
was i could see myself in these young men. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encourage me, not just my mom and grandparents, but wonderful teachers and community leaders. and they would push me to work hard and study hard and make the most of myself. and if i didn't listen, they said it again. and if i didn't listen, they said it a third time, and they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then, and i repeat it now because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i have. this is an issue of national importance. it's as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no matter who you are or where you came from or the circumstances in which you are born,
the ones that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud. >> reporter: in december 1977 california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, shut down utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock. the plume rose 5,000 feet and like a tidal wave spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil was shipped up here and just dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. neil flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred cases of "cocci" here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> reporter: it killed 6 and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer, she knows -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: -- and all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area back in the '70s. it even killed one of the great apes at the san francisco z
in a more for giving environment. he had a mom and he had grandparents and teachers who really looked out for him. and his view was that every child should have the opportunities that he had. and we all have a responsibility to make sure that we provide that to them and there are many examples of programs that are working that are really improving these young men, the boys lives and putting them on a positive trajectory. and it is our collective responsibility to take the programs to scale so that we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. and that is not just for moral reasons. but because it is good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we should invest in them. >> you talk about what is good for our economy and what is important for business. and after all, you will need the partnership of business. this is initiative that would be funded not by the federal government. >> that's right. the president said this is not another big federal government program. in fact, we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the
environment. >> the idea zero return goes to charles plosser. do we have challenges in investment? do low interest rates distort american finance? i think there are a lot of people that complain. is worried that we distort various price signals. >> you worry about chronic low interest rates. >> how long will it take before the pressures of that begin to show up and financial stability and capital going where does not need to go. the more central banks around the world and the fed try to distort the signals, the distortions build up over time. >> capital going places, being turned around quickly. not much sign of the traditional money velocity. there is a ratio of how much money is in the system. that has more to do with other things. i do not think that is driving the search for yield that we see. bank loans have fallen. they are up a little bit. are there optimistic signs that things have turned or are starting to turn? economy is in better shape than it has been in a couple of years. man i have never been one to protect that we're going to see four percent or five percent growth out of
with a bully in russia that more than willing to bully its way to decree alt the kind of government environment andal lie it wants in the ukraine, no matter what the ukrainian people want. we do need to be strong. i also think we need to make sure the ukrainians don't take any unnecessary pro tvocative acts. i would fully expect lavrov to be saying what he is, whether in fact they do that or whether they have a very different understanding of what their rights are in crimea where they have the large base, may be a very different story. >> congressman, do you anticipate that congress will approve more aid for ukraine? >> i think there would be strong bipartisan support for that. there are a lot of members on both sides of the aisle that realize, this is a critical battleground in the war of ideas and not only going to help determine what kind of future ukraine has, whether they can like their neighbor in poland, have a prosperous economy and open society or recede back to what russia is looking look, awe thor tear yan and we should do all we have but it will determine for those who live in russi
was born the match, and that environment and that home lit the match. is that a fair way to say it? >> soccio: i think it's a very fair way to say it. >> stahl: after the murder, jeff's mom got custody of his four girls, because his wife pled guilty to leaving a loaded gun in the house. and every week, joann visited her son's young killer in juvenile hall. >> patterson: it's a struggle every minute of my life. because my son was murdered and i want justice for him... >> stahl: yeah. >> patterson: ...but only at the ex... that only happens at the expense of my grandson. >> stahl: what about politics with these children? do you feel any obligation to teach them about nazis? >> patterson: they're being raised conservative republican. we need more of those in california. ( laughs ) >> stahl: but what about nazism? >> patterson: it's gone for this family. >> kroft: last year, at age 13, joseph hall was convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to ten years in juvenile prison. aflac! aflac! got 'em. ♪ yeah, he's clean, boss. now listen to me, duck. i have an associate that met wi
dakota and other states are doing. you create a good environment for the economy to grow. >> that's a great contrast, this red state contrast. sam brownback in kansas, mary fallin in oklahoma, john casic in ohio. they're limiting government, reforming programs, lowering tax rates to get better investment in companies. what's so hard about this? john f. kennedy did it 50 years ago. ronald reagan about it 30 years ago. >> they believe so much in central government, central economic planning. they believe it's unfair for people to be making a lot of money when the aspiration of every american should be to make more money, get on that ladder of opportunity. it's so frustrating, larry, to be on the inside and working with these people when they don't think debt matters. the president is increasing debt, almost doubling it over the next ten or 12 years. it's incredible, given the fact that he's amassed more debt as a president than all the presidents before him combined if you take it through the rest of his administration. >> i think if the economy would grow with fresh incentives and
. but it is a different environment fundamentally from any other kind of dealing with putin. one has to understand where he is right now. his policy initiatives have been very rash. you don't do what he does unless you think the stakes are very high and in his view i think he believes the political forces out of this recent political crisis has now led yukraine to position where russia is losing it to the eu and nato and he believes that's happened in part if not engineered by the u.s. and the eu and others then strongly supported by it and come to have an exceedingly negative view of the administration, of the americans and it will be very hard to do any kind of a deal with him where you get back to the clinton proposition to trust him on a deal. we're in a different world with putin right now. >> okay. but let me ask you this. madeline albright called him delusional. is he completely delusional in reading the country with a country on the doorstep, right on the border? is he delusional or is he right to be quite paranoid about the situation and in his own way he believes acting in the best entrust of
environment that's eroding your blood vefls, causing diabetes, blood pressure issues. these are things we know. >> dr. montgomery thank you so much for your insight. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> all new next hour of "newsroom" deadline drawing for yaz's governor. she's feeling pressure to veto a bill that would give businesses the right to turn away customers. >> i ask you why you supported it? >> no thanks. >> randy didn't stop there. she goes in search of answers in the next hour of "newsroom". who feel like there's a brick on their face. who are so congested, it feels like the walls are closing in. ♪ who are so stuffed up, they feel like they're under water. try zyrtec-d® to powerfully clear your blocked nose and relieve your other allergy symptoms... so you can breathe easier all day. zyrtec-d®. find it at the pharmacy counter. zyrtec-d®. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusi
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